The Lord’s Day

 

  1. On which day do Christians weekly celebrate their redemption?

Believers rejoice in their redemption through Christ on a daily basis, but they set aside the first day of the week, Sunday, as a special day of celebration; this is called the Lord’s Day.

(Revelation 1:10, Acts 20:7)

 

  1. Why did God command the nation of Israel to celebrate the seventh day of the week under the Old Covenant?

God commanded the nation of Israel to celebrate on the seventh day of the week to remind them that He created the world in six days and rested on the seventh day.

(Genesis 2:1-2)

 

  1. How did the nation Israel under the Old Covenant celebrate the seventh day of the week?

The nation of Israel commemorated the creation of the world, and God as the Creator, on the seventh day of the week by resting from all their labors as God had done on the seventh day of creation.

(Exodus 20:8-11)

  1. Why do Christians celebrate on the first day of the week?

Christians celebrate their redemption on the first day of the week, the Lord’s Day, in order to commemorate the resurrection of Christ which took place on that day.

(Mark 16:2)

 

  1. What does celebrating on the first day of the week signify?

Christ rose from the dead on the first day of the week, and by so doing redeemed the old creation which had fallen in Adam; by celebrating on the first day of the week Christians commemorate the beginning of the new creation and God as the Redeemer.

(2 Corinthians 5:17-19)

 

  1. How do Christians celebrate the Lord’s Day?

Christians celebrate the Lord’s Day by gathering together for corporate worship; they praise God, pray together, listen to the preaching and public reading of God’s word, and they share the Lord’s Supper.

(Acts 2:42)

 

  1. How else do Christians celebrate the Lord’s Day?

Besides corporate worship, Christians also set aside the Lord’s Day for family worship and personal devotion.

(Ephesians 6:4)

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